Contact Me

Any time - drop me an email
miriamhendeles@gmail.com
1-323-243-7116

Contact Me

Any time - drop me an email
miriamhendeles@gmail.com
1-323-243-7116

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About bubbyjoysandoys

Hi – I’m a kvelling grandmother who loves to write and blog about my insights and observations related to being a “bubby” as well as other favorite topics. I’m also a music therapist, author of a grandmother book, “Mazel Tov! It’s a Bubby!” about the joys and “oys” of being a mother, mother-in-law, and grandmother. Finally, I’m a self-proclaimed expert on mother-in-law/daughter-in-law relationships, with another site called http://milhood101.com, where I give tips to mothers-in-law for coping.

A Potato Chip by Any Other Name….

From time to time I post stories about things I learned from my toddler grandson. We really do learn a lot from our children and grandchildren.

So the other day when my grandson who is turning three next month corrected me on my terrible vocabulary mistake, I realized how important language is and how we need to pay attention to our words.

I asked him how he was enjoying his “chips” which is what he calls “potato chips.” Without skipping a beat and barely swallowing said chips, he corrected me, “It’s NOT chips, Omi! It’s Bissli.”

 

Oh my! How could I make such a serious mistake?! You all know that Bissli and Potato Chips are two entirely different snacks and here I had the audacity to imply they were one and the same.

Lesson learned: Watch your language; you will be called on it.

I think there is much to be said about calling things by their appropriate names. About a month ago, I wrote a thank you card to a friend who had done a huge favor to me. She commented later to me that she appreciated that I spelled her name correctly. Apparently, she spells her first name differently from the typical way to spell that name. Without divulging who she is, here’s an example: If her name is “Judy,” she spells is “Judie.” Or if her name is Rebecca, she spells it Rebeka. And she was glad that I – unlike many others – remembered to spell it correctly on the card.

I thought of my grandson and how he was particular not to confuse the names of Bisly and Pringles. And I realized that I’m going to pay attention to other people’s desires for precision in spelling, pronunciation and vocabulary usage. If it doesn’t make a difference to me, why annoy the other person with sloppiness?

A person’s name is precious to him or her. He or she values a name. So the next time you buy a canister of Pringles,

 

don’t you dare call them potato chips.

 

 

Or Bissli……………

Call them by their proper name, or you WILL be corrected. By your toddler or pre-school aged grandson.

Show respect for words and their meanings. Don’t ever say, “Oh it’s the same thing….let’s not make a big deal.”

Because it is a big deal. Words matter.


Groovy Granny’s Back-To-School Musings

It’s back to school for  my grandsons and that includes a couple of toddlers in playgroups, a kindergartener, first grader, a fourth grader and a fifth grader.

I remember those days back when I was in those classes and beyond. I recall the mix of emotions – from anticipation, worry, excitement, happiness to eagerness. I remember looking  forward to the daily music, art, lessons and new friendships. To the newness in everything.

Children’s Art

 

And today,  as a grandmother who doesn’t attend formal school anymore, I still can relate to every one of those feelings of going back to school. The newness and freshness of a back-to-school child are feelings I enjoy in my everyday life with all its mundaneness.

“Back to school” feelings don’t only belong to children who begin school each year. The feelings and experiences are universal to everyone in our everyday experiences, even grandmothers, bubbies and all of us in middle-aged years.

Here they are – the newness of our lives as groovy grandmas and groovy grownups.

  1. New Friends – Both online and in person I tend to collect friends and acquaintances.
  2. New Clothes – Ya, I buy those sometimes and it’s a great feeling.
  3. New Lessons – every failure and success is a chance to learn new lessons.
  4. New Classrooms – whether in the grocery store or at our computer, we create our virtual classrooms.
  5. New Teachers – I look to my friends, family, students and grandchildren as my mirror and teacher.
  6. New Books – We feel like we are inundated with reading material, but each day I try to weed out the relevant material and incorporate
  7. New Chances – Opportunities abound every day of our lives. Do we grab them or let them pass?
  8. New Games – Our leisure time is spent with games, laughter and fun. Or do we create unhealthy games to mask our true feelings in relationships?
  9. New Rules – We are continuously reconciling old and new rules and figuring things out.
  10. New Shoes – Who doesn’t love a new pair of shoes? Or two or three?

 

What are your Back-To-School Life experiences?

 

 


Six Ways to Chill Like a Baseball Fan

A few days ago, I took two of my grandsons – ages 9 and 6 – to a baseball game. On a hot day we packed up some snacks, mitts and drinks and headed off to the ball park to watch the Los Angeles Dodgers play the Atlanta Braves. I got to spend a few hours of quality time with my grandsons and it was fun chilling out a bit from the stress of the work week. And the kids? They had a blast rooting for their team and just enjoying America’s pastime.

Ballgames get us to relax.  And heaven knows, we all need to relax and chill out these days. Adults are so uptight about politics and news. People argue on social media and shout their opinions to anyone who will listen. These days,  either you’re angry and on the offensive or you’re upset and on the defensive. Either you’re furious with everything Trump does or says or you’re thinking that his critics are too harsh.

And will this tension ever stop? The mental health of our collective society is in jeopardy. Seriously, it should be mandatory for people to go to ballgames regularly. Baseball is America’s pastime and it brings out the best in people.

For our family, baseball  games elicit positive associations of family togetherness.  My husband, a baseball fan since childhood especially enjoys relaxing at the game.

For the past four or five years we’ve taken some of the grandsons. The kids are into it, and my husband enjoys sharing  his love of his childhood pastime with them.

While my husband and I get an outing with the grandchildren full of quality time, their parents get some alone time at home. It’s win-win.

With much of society bickering  and fighting these days about politics, I believe we could  learn a thing or two from baseball fan behaviors. Here they are (in no particular order).

  1. NO ONE INSULTS THE HOSTING TEAM:  At our game, Dodgers played the Braves.  Even if you’re a fan of the opposing guest  team you may want your team to win, but you don’t go crazy if they don’t and you certainly don’t start insulting those on the host team.
  2. SCREAMING IS OKAY, EVEN EXPECTED: You can scream your lungs out and chant in your loudest voice, and nobody will stop you. How cool is that? Cheering, screaming, booing, yelling are all par for the course. Everyone is chill about it. Nobody gets offended or uptight.
  3. NO ONE ACTS LIKE SORE LOSERS: At the end of the game, when the winner is announced, everyone accepts it and heads back to their cars. Yes, they may feel disappointed if their own team didn’t win, and may try to analyze what went wrong, but still they for the most part they rejoice in the winner.
  4. RULES ARE FOLLOWED: As much as the atmosphere is light-hearted, the rules of the game are followed to the tee.
  5. LIFE SLOWS DOWN FOR A FEW HOURS: Baseball is a slow and almost boring game, but that’s just what makes it so relaxing. You can space out for a few minutes and then get up to speed on what’s happening by looking at the scoreboard or asking your seatmate.
  6. NO ONE SHAMES OR BAD MOUTHS THE PLAYERS: You don’t hear people ditching out dirt on the team’s pitcher or batter. People are just nice. No one gets political about baseball. When playing ball, we just play ball

Okay, there are exceptions at times to this good behavior, but for the most part, baseball is a game where everyone is just nice and just chills out.

And there you have it. Six things to learn from baseball fans. Imagine if Democrats and Republicans treated each other the way two opposing fans watching a baseball game treat each other. Imagine that.

Now let’s chill out at the political game …Scream all you want…just no more fighting! And to prove that you’re a real baseball fan – let’s sing the baseball song!

And here’s a song: (to the tune of “Take me out to the ballgame”)

Let’s just chill -let’s not argue

Let’s have fun and not fight smilingface1

Dems and Repubs let’s have each other’s backs

Hoping the Donald turns Cracker Jack

Try to root root root for the Trump team

Stop all the anger – a shame!

For it’s 1-2-3 and then 4

Years

Until he gives up his game!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Farewell to Challah: An Open Letter

Dear Challah,

After many weeks of deliberating on my relationship with you, I’ve decided to say good-bye to you. I am putting this letter on a public forum in the hopes that others may also gain insight in what works for them.  I think it’s crucial that I finally address our co-dependent relationship. Hopefully, this will be the first step toward my recovery.

First, let me say that I appreciate all you have done for me over the years. Every Friday night at our Shabbat table, since my childhood, you’ve provided me with comfort, warmth and excellent taste. As my father would make the blessing on the bread with our entire family around the table, then cut you into even slices, and pass around a piece to each one of us, I’d wait with my mouth watering and eyes glazed with love.

Then, invariably, after everyone took their first bite, the compliments would flow. First my father would praise my mother for baking you so perfectly. My mother would smile and shrug, and kind of humbly say, “Oh it’s the new oven” or “It’s my friend’s recipe.” But we knew she was just being modest. You were great. Maybe she brought out the best in you, but still you were great and we all knew it.

Truth is, you were special and you excelled on your own, without anyone to help you out.  Your recipe was quite simple and accessible that when my mother bought me as a wedding gift a Kitchen Aid mixer, I learned quickly how to bake you almost as well as my mother.  Yea, I compared myself to my mother when around you, which was also a problem. But still, I felt good baking you so well and of course you were yummy to eat.

Your ingredients were so basic and earthly: flour, oil, eggs, salt, sugar, yeast. So even when you had a bad day and didn’t turn out as well as other times, you were still great to have around. Soft, sweet and tasty. The best comfort food around.

Over the years we’ve become attached at the hips – (mine, not yours).  I’d eat one piece, then two, then three. My mother would look at me with that expression of “control yourself, there’s a whole meal ahead of us.” But I was on a roll and I couldn’t stop. Back then, it didn’t matter that gefilte fish, chicken soup, brisket, salad, chicken and potato kugel were to follow. I wanted you and only you. I was willing to share my stomach with the others, but you came first.  Your aroma was enticing, your flavor and texture were wonderful. But you became addictive and  your calories were  way beyond my allotment for a meal.

These days I’ve evolved and have become more introspective than I was back in the day. But at some level, I’m still that little girl. I may tell myself that I’m big and grown-up and I can eat “just” one piece and stop. I may try to convince myself that “come on, just have the crust or end of a piece and stop right there.” And here’s the thing: I really like you. I think you are good.

But you don’t work for me. At least not right now. Dear Challah, no matter how many times I promise myself that I will just have one small challah roll (the equivalent of a few points on Weight Watchers) or just one end piece, I always go back for another. And another.

You’ve been calling my name for so long that I hear your voice calling out “Eat me, eat me…I’m here for you…” every week at our Shabbos table. I’m a mother and grandmother and I still find you very seductive.

I can no longer succumb. I have to say good-bye. Just as an addicted alcoholic says, “One drink is too many and a thousand is not enough….” I say the same about you.

“One slice is too many, and a thousand is not enough.” You are an addiction and I must let go.

A few weeks ago, I was at a wedding and a friend and we made a pact. We both promised ourselves that we would not eat the challah bread at the wedding. We were going to hold back, and just eat the meal. No challah for us. Well, it didn’t work. I found myself washing my hands, making the blessing and then eating it. I didn’t ask my friend if the pact worked for her, but for me, it was a no-go.

And so dear Challah, in spite of my efforts to cut down, to use portion control, to enlist a buddy to do it together, nothing has worked for me. Our relationship has become toxic.  We need a separation. I need to make that difficult decision to not even have a tiny piece of you. Because as much as you arouse those warm and fuzzy feelings of childhood, and as much as I adore you, our relationship is not working out well at this time.

I say this all with sadness. I admit you are delicious, charming, charismatic, warm and inviting, but I can no longer hang around you. Ironically, I can still eat your cousins – certain kinds of whole wheat breads and matzoh. For some reason, I am able to have them in my life in moderation. But not you.

You – my dear challah – I can no longer have you in my own life. Not for now.  Not when you’re clothed in whole wheat, spelt, white flour, or poppy seeds. Not your water recipe, nor your egg recipe. Not your raisin toppings, nor your sesame seed toppings. Not your round ones nor your oval shape.

None of you. I say good-bye.

Good-bye Challah. Farewell.

Your friend,

Miriam


My Expression of Gramma-Tude

Life is hard and complicated and I find myself complaining about stuff to my husband,  friend or two, relative, my mom,  sister(s), my husband (oh, did I mention him already?) or anyone who will listen.

But other times, I just feel a surge of gratitude for the blessings in my life. And at those times I write. This happened a few weeks ago when I wrote an article for Binah Magazine about my gratitude or “Gramma-tude” for my life as a grandmother.

And a special shout out to Ruchi Koval of  Outoftheorthobox.com, whose insight constantly inspires me, and whose anecdote is part of this article.

Please click on the photos below to view the article. Or print them out for easier reading…


Too Much Toddler Cuteness

My two-year old grandson, also known as The Toddler is too cute these days and it’s driving me crazy. Terrible Twos should be renamed Too-Twos, because they are too-too cute.

I look at my grandson who is 2 and I melt. Then I stop doing whatever I’m doing such as working, cleaning, cooking, shopping, writing. And I simply stare at him and marvel at the cuteness that is in that miniature man.

Seriously, it should be illegal for kids to be so darn cute and funny. And this is NOT a humble bragging post. This is real.

How is anyone supposed to get anything done when grandchildren are around?

Actions of my toddler grandson that melt my heart. Why do I love you? Let me count…

  1. The way he mispronounce words and phrases. No one bothers to correct them because we love it. Jackie his teacher is Gackie. Chocolate milk is Goka-milk. This is Dis.
  2. The way he toddles around, runs, jumps and skips
  3. The way he giggles.
  4. The way he sings- right on tune, and filling in all the words to the ends of lines.
  5. The way he guess the color of objects and get it right about 50% of the time. Green (geen) seems to be the default when he doesn’t know. “White one” is also a trial answer for “I don’t know”
  6. His blond curly hair is gorgeous.
  7. His cute memory of new words and phrases every day.
  8. His concentration in playing with toys, does puzzles (buzzles) and builds with maga-tiles (wacky-tiles).
  9. His arguing and debating. No! No! No! (when his mommy or daddy say yes) and Yes! Yes! Yes! (when his mommy or daddy say yes)

Anyone have more cuteness behaviors to add to this list. Feel free to “kvell” away in the comments below. It’s good for us to share, to write, to spell it all out below. Maybe that will help us get it out of our system so we can move on to doing the real stuff

Like writing a blog with some objective depth.

End of Kvell. Back to work.


Fidget Spinners and Other Fun Grandchildren Bonding Activities

 

One of the reasons I love being a grandmother is that I think of every interaction with them as fun. Just having a silly conversation and making funny faces with my two and a half year old grandson is a blast but that’s another article!

A few weeks ago, reader Leah Hastings of Pure Flix media, wrote in to suggest I post some ideas for grandmothers to do with their grandchildren. Thanks, Leah!

So….Here are 10 fun ideas which are a mixture of culturally Jewish ideas and general population ideas. All are good, but since I’m a Jewish Bubby or grandmother, I veer towards the Jewish stuff! So come along with me and explore these ideas….

  1. Listen to CD’s of a  funny tape: My grandchildren love to listen to funny tapes which are usually educational stories and songs acted out by professional writers and actors and sold in Judaica stores. Really fun tapes filled with lessons on good character traits  are “When Zaidy Was Young”  and “The Marvelous Midos Machine”.These are wonderfully entertaining – for adults and children –and are useful for playing in the car during long and short errands. Play it at home in the kitchen or family room and sit around and laugh and learn. It’s great stuff and the lyrics and tunes will stay with you for a long time.
  2. Sharing Fads and Crazes: When I was a child, it was the Hula Hoop. When our kids were growing up it was the Rubik’s Cube which went out of style and then came back a few years ago when my own grandsons were pre-schoolers! How perfect. Just these past few weeks, the newest fad is the FIDGET SPINNER.                      It’s wild. It’s great for the kids to have something to share with their friends (during recess only, I’m told!) It’s not too expensive or hard on the parents’ wallets.  It’s fun for those kids with or without ADHD. (but don’t we all have a little bit of ADHD?) And best of all, it’s great as a conversation starter.  I love listening to my grandsons tell me about this fad, showing me how it works and asking my many silly questions (they are very patient with me!).
  3. Friday Night Shabbat Meal: Another fun activity revolves around our Friday night Shabbos or Shabbat meal when our son, daughter-in-law and grandsons eat with us. Every week, they come home from school with a handout from their teacher. The handout consists of questions on topics from the Torah Portion or Parsha of the week that the children have learned. My husband and my son read through the questions and when one of the kids doesn’t know the answer or hesitates, my husband makes up some silly choices with the correct choice being the only logical one. This always gets the boys to laugh and warms my heart because I know we are creating memories.
  4. Baseball Game Outing: Every summer we take the boys to a Dodger Game and the boys love it. It has become a tradition for the past six years since our older grandson was only three. It’s hard to believe he sat still for the entire game at that age, but he did. Anyway, we bring along hot dogs from home and other snacks and take lots of pictures and my husband explains the game to the boys and it’s really a lot of fun. Their mommy and daddy don’t come along, by the way. It’s a great way to give them time off. Oh yeah, we are due for that trip to the ballpark this summer, but the season just started so we’ll wait a month or so.
  5. Day at the Park: This is simple fun – we usually do this on a Sunday afternoon. We grab some balls of all sizes, sandwiches, water bottles, mitts and some scooters. And we head to the park and have a picnic. We haven’t done this for some time and just writing about it is making me excited to suggest it for a future Sunday.
  6. Playing Board or Card Games: As mentioned above, the most popular one is chess. I rarely beat my grandsons and the game goes by pretty fast before they “check-mate” me, so this one doesn’t take that much time. But it’s fun while it lasts.
  7. Reading Books – I love reading “The Cat in the Hat” to my 2 year old grandson. He gets really into it and  he points to the pictures on the page, enthusiastically naming  them. We have a blast, turning the pages (when he lets!)  and discuss his topics about the “fish,” and the “water,” and Thing One and Thing Two.
  8. Singing Songs and Finger Plays: I love singing songs to my toddler grandson. I also enjoy doing the motions and watching him giggle, sing and imitate my motions. He already knows some of the songs like “Itsy Bitsy Spider” and others from his playgroup so he’s an experienced guy. Recently we did “Head, shoulders, knees and toes….” and I just adore the way he’s picking up all the names of body parts.
  9. Piano Lessons: The old expression is that the shoemaker’s kids go barefoot, but this piano teacher is not going to allow her grandsons to grow up without piano lessons. So even if I have to give them a lesson here and there when we see each other and when I and they have time, I will do that! So far it’s been fun, if not sporadic. A few lessons on rhythm, note reading and such. They love it, I love it, and it keeps us bonding. And by the way, when they prepared an anniversary card for my husband and me several months ago, they wrote about us “Omi (that’s my grandmother name!) teaches us how to play piano!” And reading that made me proud!
  10. Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf: It’s always a fun tradition to take the boys for a cookie or Danish, or other snack at the Coffee Bean near our home. It serves as a special time with grandparents.

Is Busy the New Lazy?

Hello everyone! I’ve been so busy lately that I haven’t had a chance to post on my beloved blog for the last two months.

Excuses. Excuses. Busy. Busy. Busy.  The truth? I kept procrastinating. I told myself I was “Busy,” but I knew there was more going on that I wasn’t admitting to myself.

And so, I wrote an article, which was published in this past week’s Binah Magazine and  the title of the article is “Busy No More.”

This Sunday is Purim when many of us get so busy preparing food packages for our myriad friends and acquaintances, cooking the food for the holiday, and dressing the kids up in the sharpest costumes ever.

Do we miss the points of the holiday (joy, gratitude, friendship) with all our busy-ness?

Can we just relax and live in the moment? Can we be present in the here and now and not worry about all the things we have to do in the future?

Since writing the piece, I’ve been trying to live my life without talking about the B word. (not breathing – that’s a good B word).  It’s a process for me, one minute, hour, day at a time.

I’m curious to know what my readers and followers  (who are no doubt just as B as I am) think about this idea of “Busy No More.” Let me know in the comment section below.

And now, I can return those phone calls I let go to voice mail because I was too Busy, I mean Focused on composing this post.

Hope you enjoy and don’t forget to Breathe!


Give Them a Break, Okay?

It’s getting a bit unnerving the way the media is grabbing every opportunity to  find fault with Donald Trump’s family.  I know that President Trump has many quirks, all great fodder for cynical writing. I know that he argues and gets defensive and twitters and tweets and all that.

I get that. And I’m not going to debate that here.

But can’t the media give his family a break? Why does the media have to poke fun at his wife all the time?

In my opinion, the Ralph Lauren blue dress she wore to the Inauguration was beautiful and classy.

But instead of leaving it at that – a beautiful first lady in a very appropriately chosen dress – the media has to rip it apart and analyze it.   They write that  she “channeled” (code for copied) Jackie Kennedy’s blue outfit back in 1961.  Like they know what was on her and her designer’s mind.

Now, I don’t remember what Jackie wore back then (I was only 1), so I did a search  and my impression was that the only thing the two outfits had in common was they were both blue. Melania is a woman with class in her own right and she is not trying to mimic Jacqueline Kennedy.

But the media already has decided that she did. And so it becomes fact.

Then there’s the son, Barron. From the facts I’ve read about him, he seems like a smart and typical kid. He seems pretty cute to me. On the night of the election he was tired and seemed to struggle to stay awake. Big deal.

The media has to rip him apart. At the election three months ago, he wasn’t smiling and seemed tired and bored. Hello, it was late. One time a kid is bored and tired and suddenly everyone is making up stories. Playing the game of Dr. Google.

Suddenly people are inventing – no, diagnosing  things about him that are just untrue.

A famous celebrity and someone else actually wrote false things about him having a certain neurological disorder. They have since apologized and hopefully retracted (but not before Melania threatened to sue), but this is wrong. Children of politicians are supposed to be off limits to rude comments.

Today I saw a clip of him playing peek-a-boo with his toddler nephew at the inauguration. To me, that’s a perfectly appropriate behavior for  a kid his age. I think all the Professor Googles can put their diagnostician hats away.

It’s none of these people’s  business. It’s none of anyone’s business to diagnose another person’s child, or to project what’s going on in their own life onto someone else’s life.

It’s none of anyone’s business why the First Lady is keeping her son at his NY school till June. That’s her  prerogative to decide, and frankly, I respect Melania for that. She’s putting her motherhood before her position as First Lady. I think that’s admirable.

Another thing – while I’m on the topic of ridiculous things that the media writes about is the green outfit that Ivanka wore the day before the inauguration. I read in a particular article that the green symbolizes growth, change and moving forward. And, then the writer  went on to say that green also signifies jealousy.

Maybe someone can enlighten me as to what the point of that article was?

And finally, the mystery gift that Melania gave to Michelle Obama before the inauguration was received awkwardly according to the press and now the media is up in arms and pointing out that Michelle must have disliked receiving the gift.

Instead of just saying “oh, isn’t that lovely that she gave a gift to Michelle,” people have to analyze and overthink things.

Whether it’s a beautiful dress at a special event, a young child’s fatigue or boredom, or a gracious gift given to another politician, I really wish the media would just take some things at face value.

I know there’s a fascination with the family of the president but can’t people just give them a break already?

 

 


No More Complaining About the Weather!

In NY where  it gets cold in the winter and hot in the summer, people don’t really talk much about the weather. Over there, where the leaves shed from trees in the fall and the flowers bloom in the spring, nobody talks much about it. They don’t complain. They don’t boast.  They are grateful for the pleasant seasons and are quiet when the not-so-good climate changes come around.

The only time someone might bring it up is if they address a practical concern such as how to dress for the weather. Or someone might grab the topic  as an anchor in order to politely redirect an unpleasant conversation, as in “Ummm, how’s the weather down there?”

But here in Los Angeles, we talk a lot about the weather.

When it’s sunny, we boast and gloat. When it’s chilly — that means 60 degrees or below — we complain.

And when it rains – and boy does it rain in a typical winter of December through February —  the conversations begin in unison while putting on boots, rain jackets and other gear.

girl-with-umbrella

 

As we bundle up, dramatically pulling a scarf around neck, we share  with friends how we either love — or hate– the rain.

And then came The Drought. No rain for five or six years. Yeah, a trickle or a tease here and there. And maybe a few short ten minute showers, but for the most part? Nothing. Nada. Grass turned brown. The air was dry. The reservoirs dried up.

We conserved water. We set our sprinkler timers to spray water one or two times per week. Or we ran the hose around the lawn for a few minutes only. We took shorter showers, loaded larger and fewer washing machine and dishwasher loads.

Instead of chatting calmly to each other about the weather, we listened to the experts warn us: If we used too much water from our starving reservoirs, we’d be fined.

We silently hoped, wished and even prayed for rain.

Now, after five or so years, we  finally have some serious rain.

And…something interesting happened.

People stopped complaining.

For one, it’s no longer politically correct  to whine about the nastiness or draft. These days,  no self-respecting Angelino after experiencing the drought would complain about rainy weather.

But the real reason we don’t complain about rain anymore is that we’re happy. We genuinely appreciate that rain, the freshness, the feeling of water coming from a higher Source.

Once we lose something we miss it.

And then if we are lucky and blessed enough to have that lost thing or experience returned to us, we value it. We know that good things in life are not to be taken for granted.

We realize that there are some things in life that we just cannot take for granted,  can’t control or hold onto forever.  At the end of the day, we don’t have control over every facet of our destinies.

We can lose stuff in the blink of an eye. We saw that with the rain.

We may have personal instances where we lose things in our lives and then are fortunate to have those things returned.

A lost item is found. Someone without a job finds a good one. An ill friend is cured.

A stream of bad fortune in life is followed by some happy occasions: An engagement, a marriage, a new baby.

Bad times  become good. Things in our lives improve.

When I broke my ankle three years ago, I was in pretty bad shape.

Buzzzz…ohhh. it tickles

For the better part of a year I dealt with surgeries, bed rest, and pain. Finally, after almost nine months, the physical therapy began. And when I was once again able to walk, I was thrilled.

As the pain lessened, and my limp lessened and then disappeared, I felt gratitude for every step I take on firm ground.

Till today, I wear comfortable shoes and have banished most high heels but I don’t care. Three years after I broke my ankle, I remember the pain and anguish I suffered. And I will (almost) never forget to be grateful  for the miracle of a working ankle.

Nowadays when it rains here in the Hollywood, you’ll hear people saying, “isn’t it great?” or “don’t you just love this weather?” Or  “Oh, yes, G-d knows we need it,” or “We prayed for this.” Because even if people hate cold weather no one would express that during these days of rain after drought.

Let us look around us at all the blessings we have today. Things are far from perfect. G-d knows, our country has its arthritis and its bones are aching. Many are without jobs. Families and friends have stuff that’s going on in their lives that makes things hard for them.

But let’s open our eyes and ears for the good that comes our way. When we do get those showers of blessings, let’s embrace them.

Let’s sing in the rain how happy we are.

Let’s show empathy for those who have less in some areas. Let’s have courage to try to improve the lacks in our own lives.

Just yesterday I heard the radio announcer predict rain for today and the weekend and although I was tempted  to vent, complain, kvetch and rant, I stopped myself.

Instead I say:

Bring on the rain!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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